Friends of old Folkestone Cemetery
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Significant Memorials, Headstones and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected and interesting people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired. As we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

Alfred and Elizabeth Watkin

Sir Alfred Mellor Watkin . Baronet.1948-19141877 MP for Great Grimsby 1881 census shows him as a locomotive engineer, living in castle hill avenue. In 1891 the census lists him as a railway administrator, with 3 servants still in Castle Hill avenue.1901 census, he is now a "Director of (South Eastern) Railways" 1911 he now appears as "Sir" on the census and is living in Dunedin Lodge Cheriton Garden (which is now Dunedin Court and flats), he's now got 5 servants. He died at this house in 1914.His Will shows that his wife is a Dame (also on the same grave), and he left around £4 million (in today's money) to split between his brother, wife and the secretary of South Eastern railways. His father was Sir Edward Watkin, who was an MP for many constituencies including Hythe 1874-1895. He built the Great Central Line into London, helped Canada build railways (he published a book about these travels), collected £2 million to fund the first public parks in Manchester and Salford. In 1880 he started to dig a Channel Tunnel from Folkestone and reached nearly 2km, before being made to stop as the government feared France might invade through it! He also started to build Britain's very own Eiffel Tower at Wembley, but it only reached the first level. His grandfather was Absalom Watkin, Wikipedia explains: Absalom Watkin, was an English social and political reformer, an anti corn law campaigner, and a member of Manchester's Little Circle that was key in passing the Reform Act 1832. Catherine Elizabeth Payne Watkin 1854-1944 She appears with her husband on 1881 census in Castle Hill Avenue. After her husband’s death in 1914, I found her on a passengers list on the ship Dunnotta Castle from South Africa to Southampton - at 84 years old! Her Will shows she had moved to Holland Villas Road in Kensington, London (this house sold for £16,250,000 last year!!!). Catherine left £1million (perhaps she spent the rest of it on cruises around the world?!)
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS
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Significant Memorials,

Headstones

and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected and interesting people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired. As we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

Alfred and Elizabeth Watkin

Sir Alfred Mellor Watkin . Baronet.1948-19141877 MP for Great Grimsby 1881 census shows him as a locomotive engineer, living in castle hill avenue. In 1891 the census lists him as a railway administrator, with 3 servants still in Castle Hill avenue.1901 census, he is now a "Director of (South Eastern) Railways" 1911 he now appears as "Sir" on the census and is living in Dunedin Lodge Cheriton Garden (which is now Dunedin Court and flats), he's now got 5 servants. He died at this house in 1914.His Will shows that his wife is a Dame (also on the same grave), and he left around £4 million (in today's money) to split between his brother, wife and the secretary of South Eastern railways. His father was Sir Edward Watkin, who was an MP for many constituencies including Hythe 1874- 1895. He built the Great Central Line into London, helped Canada build railways (he published a book about these travels), collected £2 million to fund the first public parks in Manchester and Salford. In 1880 he started to dig a Channel Tunnel from Folkestone and reached nearly 2km, before being made to stop as the government feared France might invade through it! He also started to build Britain's very own Eiffel Tower at Wembley, but it only reached the first level. His grandfather was Absalom Watkin, Wikipedia explains: Absalom Watkin, was an English social and political reformer, an anti corn law campaigner, and a member of Manchester's Little Circle that was key in passing the Reform Act 1832. Catherine Elizabeth Payne Watkin 1854-1944 She appears with her husband on 1881 census in Castle Hill Avenue. After her husband’s death in 1914, I found her on a passengers list on the ship Dunnotta Castle from South Africa to Southampton - at 84 years old! Her Will shows she had moved to Holland Villas Road in Kensington, London (this house sold for £16,250,000 last year!!!). Catherine left £1million (perhaps she spent the rest of it on cruises around the world?!)
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS