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William Alexander Kerr VC

Birth: July 18th 1831 Death: May 21st 1919 Indian Mutiny Victoria Cross Recipient. Map Ref: 51.084473 1.156761 A native of Scotland, he received the award from Major General F.T. Farrell at Belgaum, India on September 4, 1858 for his actions as a lieutenant in the 24th Bombay Native Infantry while serving with The southern Mahratta Irregular Horse of the British Indian Army on July 10, 1857 at Kolapore, British India. Born in Melrose, Scottish Borders, Scotland, he was commissioned in the British Army as a lieutenant and was sent to British India as part of the 24th Bombay Native Infantry and saw action in the 1857 Indian Mutiny. He was later promoted to the rank of captain and resigned from the Army in 1860 and returned to England where he became involved in horsemanship. He died in Folkstone, Kent at the age of 87. In addition to the Victoria Cross, he also received the Indian Mutiny Medal (1857-1858) with Central India clasp. Act of bravery His Victoria Cross citation reads: "24th Bombay Native Infantry. Lieutenant William Alexander Kerr. Date of Act of Bravery, 10th July, 1857. On the breaking out of a mutiny in the 27th Bombay Native Infantry in July, 1857, a party of the mutineers took up a position in the stronghold, or paga, near the town of Kolapore, and defended themselves to extremity. Lieutenant Kerr, of the Southern Mahratta Irregular Horse, took a prominent share of the attack on the position, and at the moment when its capture was of great public importance, he made a dash at one of the gateways, with some dismounted horsemen, and forced an entrance by breaking down the gate. The attack was completely successful, and the defenders were either killed, wounded, or captured, a result that may with perfect justice be attributed to Lieutenant Kerr's dashing and devoted bravery." (Letter from the Political Superintendent at Kolapore, to the Adjutant-General of the Army, dated 10th September, 1857.)" His Victoria Cross is on display at the Lord Ashcroft Gallery of the British Imperial War Museum in London, England. (bio by: William Bjornstad) Source: findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11395185  
VICTORIA CROSS
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William Alexander Kerr VC

Birth: July 18th 1831 Death: May 21st 1919 Indian Mutiny Victoria Cross Recipient. Map Ref: 51.084473 1.156761 A native of Scotland, he received the award from Major General F.T. Farrell at Belgaum, India on September 4, 1858 for his actions as a lieutenant in the 24th Bombay Native Infantry while serving with The southern Mahratta Irregular Horse of the British Indian Army on July 10, 1857 at Kolapore, British India. Born in Melrose, Scottish Borders, Scotland, he was commissioned in the British Army as a lieutenant and was sent to British India as part of the 24th Bombay Native Infantry and saw action in the 1857 Indian Mutiny. He was later promoted to the rank of captain and resigned from the Army in 1860 and returned to England where he became involved in horsemanship. He died in Folkstone, Kent at the age of 87. In addition to the Victoria Cross, he also received the Indian Mutiny Medal (1857-1858) with Central India clasp. Act of bravery His Victoria Cross citation reads: "24th Bombay Native Infantry. Lieutenant William Alexander Kerr. Date of Act of Bravery, 10th July, 1857. On the breaking out of a mutiny in the 27th Bombay Native Infantry in July, 1857, a party of the mutineers took up a position in the stronghold, or paga, near the town of Kolapore, and defended themselves to extremity. Lieutenant Kerr, of the Southern Mahratta Irregular Horse, took a prominent share of the attack on the position, and at the moment when its capture was of great public importance, he made a dash at one of the gateways, with some dismounted horsemen, and forced an entrance by breaking down the gate. The attack was completely successful, and the defenders were either killed, wounded, or captured, a result that may with perfect justice be attributed to Lieutenant Kerr's dashing and devoted bravery." (Letter from the Political Superintendent at Kolapore, to the Adjutant- General of the Army, dated 10th September, 1857.)" His Victoria Cross is on display at the Lord Ashcroft Gallery of the British Imperial War Museum in London, England. (bio by: William Bjornstad) Source: findagrave.com/cgi- bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11395185