Friends of old Folkestone Cemetery
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The Military

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired when they left service. As we discover significant military memorials or plots we will add them to these pages. In the cemeteries in the UK, there is a wealth of memorials to the dead of the First World War. These are just a few from Folkestone's Old Cemetery. There are many more in this cemetery too.

General William George Owen

Commemorated on this grave stone is Colonel Herbert Stoney Smith. H Stoney Smith commanded the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He crossed to France as a Major with the Battalion From Southampton in  September 1914. By October 1915 he was their Commanding Officer.  On the 22nd October 1915 at 11:10 am he was mortally wounded by a sniper while walking the trenches. He died at 11:30. The Medical Officer said the cause of death was a bullet through the body. The M.O was uncertain but thought it was just the one bullet. H Stoney Smith's body was conveyed to Vlamertinghe that night and buried in Poperinghe Military Cemetery at 12:30 pm on the 23rd. General Congreve VC and Captain Barrington Boyd from 16th Infantry Brigade attended the funeral. From the 2nd Leicestershire Regiment only three Officers and, one man from each company could be spared from the trenches. 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry Regiment lent their bugles to the 2nd Leicestershire's for the occasion. Sidney Thomas Pittock is commemorated on this stone. Sidney enlisted in Dover on the 24th April 1917. After training, he crossed to France on the 2nd April  1918. Sidney was killed on the opening day of the Third Battle of the Aisne, (27th May 1918) while serving with the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Harold Wall was a trooper in the 3rd (King’s Own) Hussars. At the beginning of August 1914, the regiment was stationed at Shorncliffe. On the 17th August, they crossed to Rouen from Southampton, probably on the Troopship Minnesota. Harold was almost certainly killed in a counter attack by the 3rd Hussars near Zandvoorde. Author: Peter Anderson (WW1 Blog)
ABOUT THE MILITARY CONNECTION
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The Military

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired when they left service. As we discover significant military memorials or plots we will add them to these pages. In the cemeteries in the UK, there is a wealth of memorials to the dead of the First World War. These are just a few from Folkestone's Old Cemetery. There are many more in this cemetery too.

General William George Owen

Commemorated on this grave stone is Colonel Herbert Stoney Smith. H Stoney Smith commanded the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He crossed to France as a Major with the Battalion From Southampton in  September 1914. By October 1915 he was their Commanding Officer.  On the 22nd October 1915 at 11:10 am he was mortally wounded by a sniper while walking the trenches. He died at 11:30. The Medical Officer said the cause of death was a bullet through the body. The M.O was uncertain but thought it was just the one bullet. H Stoney Smith's body was conveyed to Vlamertinghe that night and buried in Poperinghe Military Cemetery at 12:30 pm on the 23rd. General Congreve VC and Captain Barrington Boyd from 16th Infantry Brigade attended the funeral. From the 2nd Leicestershire Regiment only three Officers and, one man from each company could be spared from the trenches. 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry Regiment lent their bugles to the 2nd Leicestershire's for the occasion. Sidney Thomas Pittock is commemorated on this stone. Sidney enlisted in Dover on the 24th April 1917. After training, he crossed to France on the 2nd April  1918. Sidney was killed on the opening day of the Third Battle of the Aisne, (27th May 1918) while serving with the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Harold Wall was a trooper in the 3rd (King’s Own) Hussars. At the beginning of August 1914, the regiment was stationed at Shorncliffe. On the 17th August, they crossed to Rouen from Southampton, probably on the Troopship Minnesota. Harold was almost certainly killed in a counter attack by the 3rd Hussars near Zandvoorde. Author: Peter Anderson (WW1 Blog)
ABOUT THE MILITARY CONNECTION