Friends of old Folkestone Cemetery
© FOFC - all rights reserved. Site created by Jan Holben. Whilst every effort has been made to maintain accuracy, no responsibility is accepted for any errors in content.
 

Significant Memorials, Headstones and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected people - as we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

John Moon - the life and times

John was born in Dover in June 1786 to James Moon and Elizabeth Tagg and was baptised there a month later in the St Mary the Virgin Anglican Church.  I am almost certain that his father was the harbourmaster and acting engineer for Dover harbour between 1792 and 1832 (when he died).  James was responsible for engineering works to keep shingle from collecting at the mouth of the harbour and for the construction of clock and compass towers at the inner harbour entrance (since demolished and replaced by the current clock tower).  John had 7 sisters and two brothers. John began his career in the Customs Service in 1802 at the tender age of 16.  While in Dover, he first worked in a very junior position, but in 1810 was promoted to landing waiter (‘a customs officer who takes account of imports for purposes of taxation and watches over and certifies to the observance of the prescribed form in the shipping of exports’).  At 24 years of age, John was now in a fairly senior position – there were about 24 people in the Dover Customs Service, headed by the Collector, followed by a Comptroller, then a Landing Surveyor and then John, the Landing Waiter and another called a Searcher.  His income increased from 40 pounds per year to 300 pounds per year.   No doubt that his improved financial circumstances gave him more confidence about his future, because in August of 1811 he married Hariott Pearne.  Together they had 6 sons and 7 daughters (at least one son and one daughter did not survive childhood).  So far, I have been unable to determine the fate of most of his surviving daughters, but of the ones for whom I have some information, they married reasonably well (one husband was a surgeon, another a successful farmer and the third a customs agent).  Of his surviving sons, one became a physician in Greenwich, another a clerk in London, a couple followed careers as master mariners and one, William, my great, great grandfather, became an engineer who travelled far and wide.  Unfortunately Hariott died in December of 1831, shortly after giving birth.  She is buried in Dover. With such a large and young family and no mother, it would not be surprising if John were to seek out another partner.  And sure enough, he married Ann George in August of 1833.  Ann was 14 years younger than John, being born in Ramsgate in December of 1800.  Her parents were Robert George and Ann Sarah Shrewsbury. John was promoted to the position of landing surveyor for the Port of Dover sometime before 1839.  A landing surveyor is ‘a British customs officer who appoints and oversees the landing waiters’. However his salary remained the same.  Then in 1839 on the ‘Recommendation of the Board’ John was transferred to Liverpool as a landing surveyor and given a salary of 400 pounds per year, a significant increase.  Whereas in Dover John was the only landing surveyor, in Liverpool there were seven, as Liverpool had a much larger Customs Service with many more landing waiters to supervise.  Just before John and Ann moved, they added one girl to the household and then while in Liverpool they added a boy.  I have no idea where they lived in Dover, but their first accommodation in Liverpool was on Cambridge Street, and later they moved to 4 Brandon Terrace in Birkenhead.   John worked as a landing surveyor in the Port of Liverpool until his retirement in April of 1849.  According to his retirement papers, he had worked in Her Majesty’s Customs Service for 47 years.  His final rate of pay was 450 pounds per year and his retirement allowance was 380 pounds per year.  These documents give the cause of his retirement, but the only word I can make out is the last one, he had some form of ‘paralysis’.  He and his household then moved to 31 Bouverie Square in Folkestone, Kent, just a few miles down the coast from his birthplace.  At that time, according to the images I’ve seen, Bouverie Square was a very nice area indeed, with 3 story pristine white town houses arranged around a very large park.  I believe that Folkestone was at this time being developed as a summer seaside retreat, and that Bouverie Square may well have been the centrepiece for this development.  At any rate, it is understandable that John would seek out such nice accommodation, especially as it had the advantage of being close to his family roots.  John lived a long time in retirement, about a quarter of a century.  The 1861 and 1871 Census show that his household in Folkestone consisted of himself and his wife Ann along with one or two of his unmarried daughters, a couple of servants as well as the occasional visiting niece.  He must have been distinguished in the community, as the directories and newspapers of the day often refer to him not only by his name but also as being ‘late of the customs office’. The one person who was consistently part of his household in Folkestone was Charlotte Ann, the first of John and Ann’s children, born just before they left Dover in 1839.  Charlotte died in Westminster, London in 1874 at the age of 35, and was buried in the Cheriton Road Cemetery in Folkestone.  The inscription on her tombstone is ‘Patient in Tribulation’, so I imagine that she was not very well throughout her short life.  John himself died in October of 1875 at the age of 89 years.  He was then buried in the Cheriton Road Cemetery beside his daughter.  His will was proved by his executors, Robert George of Rochester (Ann’s brother) and John Brooke of Folkestone, both of whom were wine merchants.  The probate documents say that his estate was valued at under 1500 pounds. Ann Moon continued to live on Bouverie Square until her death in August of 1898 at the age of 97.  She too was buried in Cheriton Road Cemetery, beside her husband John and their daughter Charlotte Ann.   The probate documents say that her estate was valued at 372 pounds, which she bequeathed to her daughter in law (her son having died that very same year). My connection to John Moon is through his son William, who had a son named Francis.  Francis was born in Spain, and shortly after John Moon died, moved to Ottawa, Ontario, Canada where he joined the post office and rose to the position of Secretary before he retired in 1922.  His son Clifford became an engineer who among other projects worked on the construction of the Welland Ship Canal near St. Catharines, Ontario.  There he ad two daughters, one of which is my mother.  Graham Murray McNab-Braeside Tsp., Ontario, Canada
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS
Add your one line caption using the Image tab of the Web Properties dialog Add your one line caption using the Image tab of the Web Properties dialog Add your one line caption using the Image tab of the Web Properties dialog
LOGOTYPE
© Irure ut pariatur ad ea in ut in et. In incididunt sed tempor

Significant Memorials,

Headstones

and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected people - as we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

John Moon - the life and times

John was born in Dover in June 1786 to James Moon and Elizabeth Tagg and was baptised there a month later in the St Mary the Virgin Anglican Church.  I am almost certain that his father was the harbourmaster and acting engineer for Dover harbour between 1792 and 1832 (when he died).  James was responsible for engineering works to keep shingle from collecting at the mouth of the harbour and for the construction of clock and compass towers at the inner harbour entrance (since demolished and replaced by the current clock tower).  John had 7 sisters and two brothers. John began his career in the Customs Service in 1802 at the tender age of 16.  While in Dover, he first worked in a very junior position, but in 1810 was promoted to landing waiter (‘a customs officer who takes account of imports for purposes of taxation and watches over and certifies to the observance of the prescribed form in the shipping of exports’).  At 24 years of age, John was now in a fairly senior position – there were about 24 people in the Dover Customs Service, headed by the Collector, followed by a Comptroller, then a Landing Surveyor and then John, the Landing Waiter and another called a Searcher.  His income increased from 40 pounds per year to 300 pounds per year.   No doubt that his improved financial circumstances gave him more confidence about his future, because in August of 1811 he married Hariott Pearne.  Together they had 6 sons and 7 daughters (at least one son and one daughter did not survive childhood).  So far, I have been unable to determine the fate of most of his surviving daughters, but of the ones for whom I have some information, they married reasonably well (one husband was a surgeon, another a successful farmer and the third a customs agent).  Of his surviving sons, one became a physician in Greenwich, another a clerk in London, a couple followed careers as master mariners and one, William, my great, great grandfather, became an engineer who travelled far and wide.  Unfortunately Hariott died in December of 1831, shortly after giving birth.  She is buried in Dover. With such a large and young family and no mother, it would not be surprising if John were to seek out another partner.  And sure enough, he married Ann George in August of 1833.  Ann was 14 years younger than John, being born in Ramsgate in December of 1800.  Her parents were Robert George and Ann Sarah Shrewsbury. John was promoted to the position of landing surveyor for the Port of Dover sometime before 1839.  A landing surveyor is ‘a British customs officer who appoints and oversees the landing waiters’. However his salary remained the same.  Then in 1839 on the ‘Recommendation of the Board’ John was transferred to Liverpool as a landing surveyor and given a salary of 400 pounds per year, a significant increase.  Whereas in Dover John was the only landing surveyor, in Liverpool there were seven, as Liverpool had a much larger Customs Service with many more landing waiters to supervise.  Just before John and Ann moved, they added one girl to the household and then while in Liverpool they added a boy.  I have no idea where they lived in Dover, but their first accommodation in Liverpool was on Cambridge Street, and later they moved to 4 Brandon Terrace in Birkenhead.   John worked as a landing surveyor in the Port of Liverpool until his retirement in April of 1849.  According to his retirement papers, he had worked in Her Majesty’s Customs Service for 47 years.  His final rate of pay was 450 pounds per year and his retirement allowance was 380 pounds per year.  These documents give the cause of his retirement, but the only word I can make out is the last one, he had some form of ‘paralysis’.  He and his household then moved to 31 Bouverie Square in Folkestone, Kent, just a few miles down the coast from his birthplace.  At that time, according to the images I’ve seen, Bouverie Square was a very nice area indeed, with 3 story pristine white town houses arranged around a very large park.  I believe that Folkestone was at this time being developed as a summer seaside retreat, and that Bouverie Square may well have been the centrepiece for this development.  At any rate, it is understandable that John would seek out such nice accommodation, especially as it had the advantage of being close to his family roots.  John lived a long time in retirement, about a quarter of a century.  The 1861 and 1871 Census show that his household in Folkestone consisted of himself and his wife Ann along with one or two of his unmarried daughters, a couple of servants as well as the occasional visiting niece.  He must have been distinguished in the community, as the directories and newspapers of the day often refer to him not only by his name but also as being ‘late of the customs office’. The one person who was consistently part of his household in Folkestone was Charlotte Ann, the first of John and Ann’s children, born just before they left Dover in 1839.  Charlotte died in Westminster, London in 1874 at the age of 35, and was buried in the Cheriton Road Cemetery in Folkestone.  The inscription on her tombstone is ‘Patient in Tribulation’, so I imagine that she was not very well throughout her short life.  John himself died in October of 1875 at the age of 89 years.  He was then buried in the Cheriton Road Cemetery beside his daughter.  His will was proved by his executors, Robert George of Rochester (Ann’s brother) and John Brooke of Folkestone, both of whom were wine merchants.  The probate documents say that his estate was valued at under 1500 pounds. Ann Moon continued to live on Bouverie Square until her death in August of 1898 at the age of 97.  She too was buried in Cheriton Road Cemetery, beside her husband John and their daughter Charlotte Ann.   The probate documents say that her estate was valued at 372 pounds, which she bequeathed to her daughter in law (her son having died that very same year). My connection to John Moon is through his son William, who had a son named Francis.  Francis was born in Spain, and shortly after John Moon died, moved to Ottawa, Ontario, Canada where he joined the post office and rose to the position of Secretary before he retired in 1922.  His son Clifford became an engineer who among other projects worked on the construction of the Welland Ship Canal near St. Catharines, Ontario.  There he ad two daughters, one of which is my mother.  Graham Murray McNab-Braeside Tsp., Ontario, Canada
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS