Friends of old Folkestone Cemetery
© FOFC - all rights reserved. Site created by Jan Holben. Whilst every effort has been made to maintain accuracy, no responsibility is accepted for any errors in content.
 

Significant Memorials, Headstones and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected and interesting people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired. As we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

Arthur Mudge Branfoot

Some memorial stones get damaged and there is not much more to see than an outline of the edging stones - but that doesn’t mean this place is not important to the family and to the unfolding history of Folkestone with its many eminent residents such as Sir Arthur Mudge Branfoot. Branfoot, Sir Arthur Mudge (1848 - 1914) KCIE Dec 11th 1911; MRCS Nov 17th 1870; FRCS (elected as a Member of twenty years’ standing) April 5th 1906; LRCP Lond 1871; MB Lond (1st class honours in obstetric medicine) 1872. Born     27 February 1848 Died    17 March 1914 Folkestone -  Occupation: General surgeon Born on Feb 27th, 1848, the son of Jonathan H Branfoot, MD. Educated at Epsom College and Guy’s Hospital, and entered the Madras Medical Service as Assistant Surgeon on March 30th, 1872. He was appointed Civil Surgeon at Cocanada, and afterwards became Resident Surgeon at the General Hospital, Madras, until he was appointed in 1879 Superintendent of the Government Maternity Hospital, and in 1881 Professor of Midwifery and Gynaecology at the Madras Medical College. His promotions were, Surgeon (July 1st, 1873); Surgeon Major (March 30th, 1884); Brigade Surgeon Lieut-Colonel (April 1st, 1895); and Colonel (March 1st, 1898). On promotion to Colonel he returned to military duty as Administrative Medical Officer. In 1901 he was Surgeon General to the Government of Madras, and for a short time he served as Principal Medical Officer of the Bangalore and Southern Districts. He retired on May 19th, 1903, and on New Year’s Day, 1904, succeeded Sir William Hooper at the India Office as President of the Medical Board, with the honorary rank of Surgeon General. He held office until Feb 28th, 1913, when he retired, having reached the age limit of 65. He was a Member of the Advisory Board for the Army and Medical Services and of the Army Hospitals and Sanitary Board from 1904-1913, and a Member of Council of the Lister Institute. He married: (1) Alice Stewart, daughter of Deputy Surgeon General G S W Ogg, by whom he had two daughters, and (2) Lucy Inns, daughter of H R P Carter, CE, by whom he had a son and a daughter. He died at Folkestone on Tuesday, March 17th, 1914. General Branfoot did excellent work in the Indian Medical Service, and was rewarded with a CIE on May 21st, 1888, and with promotion to KCIE on Dec 11th, 1911. He made a great reputation for himself in Madras, and maintained it in Burma, as one who was ever ready and generous in help given to his fellow- practitioners, though he himself steadfastly declined private practice. He was of a modest and retiring disposition, kindly, and humorous. Publications: Annual Reports of the Madras Government Maternity Hospital, 1879- 1898.Sources used to compile this entry: [Personal knowledge].THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND Created: 6 May 2010 Arthur Branfoot (1848-1914) [Epsom College 1859-1866] was the son of Dr J. H. Branfoot, a practitioner in Brentwood, and brother of Edward Percy Branfoot, who was a member of the England Rugby XV [Epsom College 1870-1874]. He received his medical training at Guy’s Hospital where he  qualified M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. in 1871. He graduated M.B. (London) with First  Class Honours in obstetric medicine in 1872, and almost immediately  entered the Madras Medical Service as Assistant Surgeon. Within a very  short time he was appointed Civil Surgeon at Coconada and, afterwards,  resident Surgeon at the General Hospital, Madras, until he was appointed  Superintendent of the Government Maternity Hospital in 1879, and  Professor of Midwifery and Gynaecology at the Madras Medical College in  1881. He was also Physician to the Madras General Hospital. In 1898, he  was promoted to Colonel and immediately returned to military duties as  Administrative Medical Officer. Further promotion came in 1901 when he  was appointed Surgeon-General to the Government of Madras, and for a  short time he served as Principal Medical Officer of the Bangalore and  Southern Districts. He retired in 1903 and one year later succeeded Sir  William Hooper as President of the Medical Board at the India Office, with  the appointment for ten years as Surgeon-General. Other honours included  the Vice-Presidency of the Royal Institute of Public Health, and Principal  Medical Officer, British Armed Forces in Burma. From 1904-1913 he served  on the Advisory Boards for the Army and Medical Services and of the Army  Hospitals and Sanitary Board. He was also a Member of the Council of the  Lister Institute.  The Government Hospital for Women and Children, in Madras was  founded in 1844 as the first specialised maternity hospital in India, and  probably in Asia. It started as a small building where barely one hundred  births per year were registered but, in 1882, Sir Arthur Mudge Branfoot  founded the present-day buildings which now cater for some 18,000 births  each year. This hospital was also the birthplace of the Obstetric and  Gynaecological Society of Southern India. “General Branfoot did excellent  work for the Indian Medical Service, and was awarded the C.I.E. in 1888,  with promotion to K.C.I.E. in 1911. He made a great reputation for himself  in Madras, and maintained it in Burma, as one who was ever ready and  generous in help given to his fellow- practitioners. It was said of him that:  “He was the most distinguished example of an all-round physician and  surgeon, capable of dealing well with almost any problem in the whole  domain of medicine. It is difficult to give any conception of the feeling of  security, relief, and comfort, the presence of one with such knowledge,  experience, skill, and reputation gave to every member of the medical  profession in Rangoon.
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS
Add your one line caption using the Image tab of the Web Properties dialog
LOGOTYPE
© Irure ut pariatur ad ea in ut in et. In incididunt sed tempor

Significant Memorials,

Headstones

and Plots

Over the last 150 years Folkestone and district has been a very fashionable place to visit attracting many well connected and interesting people - as well as being the place where many senior military figures retired. As we discover significant memorials or plots we will add them to these pages.

Arthur Mudge Branfoot

Some memorial stones get damaged and there is not much more to see than an outline of the edging stones - but that doesn’t mean this place is not important to the family and to the unfolding history of Folkestone with its many eminent residents such as Sir Arthur Mudge Branfoot. Branfoot, Sir Arthur Mudge (1848 - 1914) KCIE Dec 11th 1911; MRCS Nov 17th 1870; FRCS (elected as a Member of twenty years’ standing) April 5th 1906; LRCP Lond 1871; MB Lond (1st class honours in obstetric medicine) 1872. Born     27 February 1848 Died    17 March 1914 Folkestone -  Occupation: General surgeon Born on Feb 27th, 1848, the son of Jonathan H Branfoot, MD. Educated at Epsom College and Guy’s Hospital, and entered the Madras Medical Service as Assistant Surgeon on March 30th, 1872. He was appointed Civil Surgeon at Cocanada, and afterwards became Resident Surgeon at the General Hospital, Madras, until he was appointed in 1879 Superintendent of the Government Maternity Hospital, and in 1881 Professor of Midwifery and Gynaecology at the Madras Medical College. His promotions were, Surgeon (July 1st, 1873); Surgeon Major (March 30th, 1884); Brigade Surgeon Lieut-Colonel (April 1st, 1895); and Colonel (March 1st, 1898). On promotion to Colonel he returned to military duty as Administrative Medical Officer. In 1901 he was Surgeon General to the Government of Madras, and for a short time he served as Principal Medical Officer of the Bangalore and Southern Districts. He retired on May 19th, 1903, and on New Year’s Day, 1904, succeeded Sir William Hooper at the India Office as President of the Medical Board, with the honorary rank of Surgeon General. He held office until Feb 28th, 1913, when he retired, having reached the age limit of 65. He was a Member of the Advisory Board for the Army and Medical Services and of the Army Hospitals and Sanitary Board from 1904- 1913, and a Member of Council of the Lister Institute. He married: (1) Alice Stewart, daughter of Deputy Surgeon General G S W Ogg, by whom he had two daughters, and (2) Lucy Inns, daughter of H R P Carter, CE, by whom he had a son and a daughter. He died at Folkestone on Tuesday, March 17th, 1914. General Branfoot did excellent work in the Indian Medical Service, and was rewarded with a CIE on May 21st, 1888, and with promotion to KCIE on Dec 11th, 1911. He made a great reputation for himself in Madras, and maintained it in Burma, as one who was ever ready and generous in help given to his fellow-practitioners, though he himself steadfastly declined private practice. He was of a modest and retiring disposition, kindly, and humorous. Publications: Annual Reports of the Madras Government Maternity Hospital, 1879- 1898.Sources used to compile this entry: [Personal knowledge].THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND Created: 6 May 2010 Arthur Branfoot (1848-1914) [Epsom College 1859- 1866] was the son of Dr J. H. Branfoot, a practitioner in Brentwood, and brother of Edward Percy Branfoot, who was a member of the England Rugby XV [Epsom College 1870-1874]. He received his medical training at Guy’s Hospital where he  qualified M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. in 1871. He graduated M.B. (London) with First  Class Honours in obstetric medicine in 1872, and almost immediately  entered the Madras Medical Service as Assistant Surgeon. Within a very  short time he was appointed Civil Surgeon at Coconada and, afterwards,  resident Surgeon at the General Hospital, Madras, until he was appointed  Superintendent of the Government Maternity Hospital in 1879, and  Professor of Midwifery and Gynaecology at the Madras Medical College in  1881. He was also Physician to the Madras General Hospital. In 1898, he  was promoted to Colonel and immediately returned to military duties as  Administrative Medical Officer. Further promotion came in 1901 when he  was appointed Surgeon- General to the Government of Madras, and for a  short time he served as Principal Medical Officer of the Bangalore and  Southern Districts. He retired in 1903 and one year later succeeded Sir  William Hooper as President of the Medical Board at the India Office, with  the appointment for ten years as Surgeon-General. Other honours included  the Vice-Presidency of the Royal Institute of Public Health, and Principal  Medical Officer, British Armed Forces in Burma. From 1904-1913 he served  on the Advisory Boards for the Army and Medical Services and of the Army  Hospitals and Sanitary Board. He was also a Member of the Council of the  Lister Institute.  The Government Hospital for Women and Children, in Madras was  founded in 1844 as the first specialised maternity hospital in India, and  probably in Asia. It started as a small building where barely one hundred  births per year were registered but, in 1882, Sir Arthur Mudge Branfoot  founded the present-day buildings which now cater for some 18,000 births  each year. This hospital was also the birthplace of the Obstetric and  Gynaecological Society of Southern India. “General Branfoot did excellent  work for the Indian Medical Service, and was awarded the C.I.E. in 1888,  with promotion to K.C.I.E. in 1911. He made a great reputation for himself  in Madras, and maintained it in Burma, as one who was ever ready and  generous in help given to his fellow- practitioners. It was said of him that:  “He was the most distinguished example of an all-round physician and  surgeon, capable of dealing well with almost any problem in the whole  domain of medicine. It is difficult to give any conception of the feeling of  security, relief, and comfort, the presence of one with such knowledge,  experience, skill, and reputation gave to every member of the medical  profession in Rangoon.
SIGNIFICANT MEMORIALS